What We’re Reading: Tuesday, September 18, 2012

It’s a cool and breezy morning here in Chicago. Here’s a look at what the 435Digital  team is reading today:

New Adwords feature: Shared budgets. Adwords announced today that they’ll be launching a new feature that allows advertisers to share a budget across several campaigns. Instead of having to adjust campaigns individually, you can set up your campaigns to share a budget, allowing you to increase clicks where demands calls for it.

Shared budgets is a new feature that lets you establish a single daily budget that’s shared by multiple campaigns in an AdWords account. Shared budgets can make it easier to match your AdWords spending with how your business allocates marketing budget. And they can save you time and improve your AdWords results. Let’s see how with an example.

How Shared Budgets Work
Say you’re an outdoor furniture seller with a single line of products. You’re currently running three campaigns:

  1. A desktop search campaign
  2. A mobile search campaign
  3. A remarketing campaign to reach people who have visited your site but didn’t convert

Your overall marketing plan allows you to spend $100 per day across your three campaigns. Without shared budgets, you’d next have to decide how to allocate the $100 daily AdWords budget across each of your three campaigns. Say you set a $60 daily budget for your desktop campaign, a $20 daily budget for your mobile campaign, and $20 to your remarketing campaign.

Look out, Prezi and Pinterest fans – a former video game developer in Buenos Aires is working on a new collage-based social platform. Mural.ly creates online murals where you can post things surrounding an idea, including notes on Post-its to help you communicate to the people you share it with. With image-based communications becoming more and more popular, Mural.ly has a good chance of becoming popular if it can provide unique features and added value.

A sort of cross between presentation platform Prezi and Pinterest, Mural.ly is a “flexible content format” that lets users gather videos, pictures, text, and other bits of content onto a stretchable virtual canvas they can share with others. Digital Post-its and layering tools allow users to provide context to the materials, which can come from the web, a user’s computer, or an external drive. Once the materials are collected, Mural.ly can help organize them into presentations (unlike Lexi, presentations on Mural.ly are more of an added feature than a primary function).

Over at Crain’s Small Business Week survey, you’re asked to share your five biggest social media mistakes. You will remain anonymous unless you nominate your company to be profiled.

Meanwhile, at Facebook, participants at Techcrunch Disrupt last week may have had the chance to hear Zuckerberg speak in a little more detail about the future of Facebook’s search engine. Although we still don’t know when to expect anything he did confirm that they have a team working on search right now. We are soaking up all of the theories coming out of this discussion, hoping we will see a solution that both works for the regular Facebook user trying to connect with friends but also for the brand pages trying to connect with a new social-savvy customer base.

“Zuckerberg noted, among other things, that Facebook currently processes “1 billion queries a day” without really attempting to productize a search capability. He goes on to say, “Facebook is pretty uniquely positioned to answer the questions people have. What sushi restaurants have my friends gone to in New York in the last six months and Liked? Or which of my friends or friends of friends work at a company that I’m interested in working at — because I want to talk to them about what it’s going to be like to work there. These are questions that you could potentially do at Facebook if we built out this system that you couldn’t do anywhere else. And at some point we’ll do it. We have a team working on search.””

Finally today, raise your hand if you’re already trying to figure out where to order one of these:

Popcorn Indiana may or may not be working on something called a Popinator. Real or not, we’re loving this idea for hands-free popcorn launching. If only it could read minds.